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Mad River Sojourn5

NEWS FROM THE FRIENDS

Sampling results from the fourth round of Friends of the Mad Riverís 2014 Mad River Watch (MRW) volunteer water quality program show only one site with unfavorable swimming conditions Monday morning. Lover's Lane Bridge in Moretown tested "unsuitable for swimming" (according to EPA's E. coli threshold of 235 colonies per 100 ml of water). Several other sites tested close to this level, including Ward Swimhole.

Sampling results from the third round of Friends of the Mad Riverís 2014 Mad River Watch (MRW) volunteer water quality program show many swimhole sites with unfavorable swimming conditions yesterday. Fifteen of the 36 sites tested above Vermontís Department of Healthís water quality standard in recreational waters (235 bacteria colonies per 100 ml of water), including many popular swimming holes. Of these 15 sites, 11 were main-stem Mad River sites and 4 were from tributary sites (Folsom Brook, High Bridge Brook, Shepard Brook, and Welder Brook). These high E. coli levels are to be expected given the days of dry weather leading up to rain on Sunday evening. As the rain washed pollutants through the watershed, E.coli levels in streams and rivers went up. The swimming might be more exciting in high water, but think twice before swimming after a storm!

Sampling results from the second round of Friends of the Mad Riverís 2014 Mad River Watch (MRW) volunteer water quality program show all swimhole sites with favorable swimming conditions and warming water temps!

Results are in from this first sampling week of Friends of the Mad River's 30th year monitoring water quality in the Mad River watershed! Sampling results show all swimhole sites with favorable swimming conditions. Only one of the 36 sites - High Bridge Brook where it goes in a culvert under Joslin Hill Road - tested above Vermontís Department of Healthís water quality standard in recreational waters (235 bacteria colonies per 100 ml of water). This non-swimhole site recorded an all-time high of 727 E. coli colonies per 100 ml on June 16. This is either an anomaly or evidence of a water quality problem; weíll keep our eye on this site throughout the summer.

Corrie Miller, a scientist and dedicated conservationist, will take over as Executive Director of the Friends of the Mad River (FMR) starting in March. Miller has a strong background in non-profit management and, since Tropical Storm Irene devastated the region, has worked as the Executive Director of the Ausable River Association in the eastern Adirondacks. For nearly a decade before that she lived and worked in Vermont, most recently with the Staying Connected Initiative finding community-based solutions for wildlife habitat protection.

After six great years as Executive Director, the time has come for me to say good-bye to the Friends of the Mad River (FMR), an organization that has become near and dear to my heart. I have recently accepted the Executive Director position with the Stowe Land Trust, and will be making the transition in early December. While I am very excited about my new job, I will certainly miss the Friends of the Mad River: the Board of Directors, the wonderful volunteers, our members and supporters, the community. And of course, the river.

With your help we planted thousands of trees along the Mad River over the past few years. Nice work! Now, we need to do some follow-up. We are seeking volunteers to check in on the trees, do a bit of preventative maintenance to ensure their continued survival, and identify areas that may need replanting next spring. Volunteer stweards will examine the trees, count any that have died, and possibly re-stake or remove unnecessary tree protection tubes.

Mad River Watch volunteers collected water samples throughout the watershed on Monday morning August 26th; this is the last Mad River Watch sampling date for the season. Results show favorable swimming conditions at all locations. Vermontís water quality standard for recreational waters measures E. coli bacteria, an indicator of pollution from human or animal waste and the potential presence of disease-causing organisms. The Vermont Health Department just revised the standard this year up to the EPA standard of 235 colonies E.coli per 100 mL water. None of thirty-six sites tested were in violation of the standard.

Mad River Watch volunteers collected water samples from 36 sites throughout the watershed early Monday morning. Results show no sites were in violation of Vermont water quality standards for recreational waters. The standard measures E.coli bacteria, which is found when there is fecal contamination present. High E.coli levels in water indicate the likelihood of high levels of water-borne pathogens, which can sicken swimmers. The Vermont Department of Healthís current standard for E.coli is 235 colonies per 100 ml sample.

Mad River Watch volunteers collected water samples from 36 sites throughout the watershed early Monday morning. Results show 17 of 36 sites in violation of Vermont water quality standards for recreational waters. The standard measures E.coli bacteria, which is found when there is fecal contamination present. High E.coli levels in water indicate the likelihood of high levels of water-borne pathogens, which can sicken swimmers. The Vermont Department of Healthís standard for E.coli is 235 colonies per 100 ml sample, which was recently revised upwards from a more conservative standard.

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